Sous Vide – anybody playing with it?

Home Forums Forum Sous Vide – anybody playing with it?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  H.P.Pellaprat 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #4994

    Ernie Whalley
    Participant

    I’m interested in sous vide, never tried it.Not sure if I’d get much use in a domestic kitchen but might splurge just for the hell of it. Anyone got experience with equipment (budget level); usage – good things, bad things?

  • #24291

    unclepat
    Participant

    We started to use it about 2 years ago after Mickael Viljanen convinced us we’d get great use out of it. We couldn’t live without it now. It’s fantastic for prepping large quantities in advance so we might get 100kg of beef shin at a time and have it prepped, vac packed, bathed and ready to go for the whole weekend. Once you take it out of the bag, just roll it on the pan or roast quickly in a hot oven to carmelise the outside and then finish in the sauce.

    The vac packer is the expensive bit, with the bath just being a big vessel with a temperature control. Commercial ones are about €5k but I know there are smaller ones for home use. I’ve heard a few people on twitter talk about them so might be worth a tweet.

    We have found that it reduces the workload considerably and allows us to come up with new takes on a dish ( for example, cooking featherblade for 48 hours and serving it perfectly medium rare and really tender). We only use it for tough cuts and I never understand people who cook squab or salmon etc in there. For me, it takes something which already has a tender texture and makes it seem raw when served.

  • #24292

    Diapason
    Participant

    @unclepat wrote:

    I never understand people who cook squab or salmon etc in there. For me, it takes something which already has a tender texture and makes it seem raw when served.

    Indeed. I hate the boil-in-the-bag salmon with its slimy texture. Just…ew.

    Oh, and it probably goes without saying that I’m not attempting to do anything of the sort at home. Toasted cheese sandwiches are about my level of skill.

  • #24293

    Corinna
    Participant

    Agree, I think sous vide cooking of any fish is… just… ew.

    With meat, it can be very good, but I’ve had some bad examples of the 48 hour long time low temp cooking of tougher cuts of meat. Again, it’s a texture thing, I’m not convinced that going over the 24 hour mark is a good thing, but I’ve never had an opportunity to compare the results based on time. Nathan Myhrvold of the Modernist Cuisine tome posted a load of tables online as NathanM, and he has a lower cost homecooks book on sous vide out this year. There’s also the Can Roca cookbook, Jordi is the master of the art.

    And yep, as Uncle Pat said, might be worth seaching #sousvide on Twitter.

  • #24294

    Diapason
    Participant

    A question: is sous vide a boon for the diner (in terms of flavour and texture) or a boon for the kitchen (in terms of convenience and consistency)? It’s touted as the former, but as time goes on I’m not so sure.

  • #24295

    shortcircuit
    Participant

    I’ve had steak cooked sous vide and then finished on the pan for colour- it was excellent.
    What you get is complete uniformity of “doneness” of the cooked meat i.e deep pink from surface to surface. If cooking using conventional methods, it’s impossible not to have a “doneness” gradient throughout the thickness of the meat.

  • #24296

    unclepat
    Participant

    @corinna wrote:

    I’ve had some bad examples of the 48 hour long time low temp cooking of tougher cuts of meat. Again, it’s a texture thing, I’m not convinced that going over the 24 hour mark is a good thing, but I’ve never had an opportunity to compare the results based on time.

    If you take featherblade out after 24 hours it’s still tough as old boots…perfectly tender and still medium rare after 48 hours. We’ve had a few disasters too. I seem to recall veal breast which went rancid when we cooked it over night at 50 degrees..the whole place reeked when we got in the following morning-not pleasant.

    @diapason wrote:

    A question: is sous vide a boon for the diner (in terms of flavour and texture) or a boon for the kitchen (in terms of convenience and consistency)? It’s touted as the former, but as time goes on I’m not so sure.

    There is no doubt in my mind that sous vide benefits the kitchen more than it does the diner.

  • #24297

    H.P.Pellaprat
    Participant

    Don’t like it, but then I don’t like modern steam convection ovens (they make bad bread, no bottem crust).
    If you want to slow cook meat, use an American style enclosed BBQ

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